The 13 Homes on the 2017 AIA Austin Homes Tour

Secure your tickets now for the AIA Austin Homes Tour on October 28th and 29th.

Photo by Casey Dunn

A parallel architecture

This lake house right on the Colorado River by Pennybacker Bridge is featured on the cover of this magazine and celebrates the lake lifestyle at every turn. From the floating roof to the unrestricted view of the lake, the house will probably be the characteristic stop on the tour. Read more about this house.

alterstudio

Towering living oak tree that extends through an opening in the ceiling isn’t the only example of smart design in this 300 square foot home in Rolling Hills West. An unusual twist on a project of this kind: homeowner Chris Hill also acted as the builder. Read more about this house

Atlantis Architects

This 2,770 square foot home in Pemberton Heights, a city landmark originally designed in 1941 by the famous Austin architectural firm Fehr & Granger, has been remodeled to house a new open plan kitchen and master bathroom, and to add air conditioning, lighting and updated plumbing.

Barley | Pfeiffer architecture

This 3,967-square-foot, four-bedroom home in southwest Austin by Alan Barley and Peter Pfeiffer, green building attorneys, has attributes not often associated with modern homes: soft, balanced daylight, energy efficiency with no reliance on expensive appliances, and lesser ones Outdoor maintenance.

FAB architecture

This 2,903 square meter new building in Bouldin Creek pays homage to classic modernism and extends over four levels. The top of these levels features a rooftop terrace that rises above the treetops, providing panoramic views of downtown for homeowners and their guests.

Furman + Keil Architects

What was once a run-of-the-mill suburban home from the 1980s has been completely transformed into a contemporary wonder for a young family of three active boys. Tour participants will likely be walking back and forth between the living room and porch for most of the time.

Matt Fajkus architecture

The living room of this new 3,721-square-foot, four-bedroom Bouldin Creek home blurs the lines between inside and outside and opens to a deck and pool. The interiors may not be over the top, but they are elegant, simple and definitely camera-friendly.

Restructure studio

Designed for a young Austin family, this 327-square-foot four-bedroom home in Old Enfield blends in with the established neighborhood with its subtle exterior. The interior features a three-story dining area, walkway, and exposed structural elements.

Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects

Homeowners wanted a home where “no one could see my children’s toys or my kitchen from the front door,” and this sleek, L-shaped design on a hillside in Tarrytown does just that. The 5,331-square-foot, four-bedroom home extends over three levels.

John Mayfield Architects

This 1980s Clarksville condominium is the smallest home on the tour at 1,700 square feet and has been completely renovated to create a more open interior with natural light. The homeowners were the original developers / builders of the apartment complex 35 years ago.

Stuart Sampley architect

This eye-friendly 4,000-square-foot modern farmhouse in Bull Creek has a lovely dark gray exterior and a simple mix of materials: concrete, steel, and wood. On the inside, a mainly white color palette is broken up by splashes of color on some furniture.

Tim Brown architecture

This 4,600 square foot modern Victorian home in Rollingwood is an elegant, light-filled apartment for a family of five. The design combines clear, refined details with quirky aspects like a spiral slide that rotates from the second floor to the washroom.

Tim Cuppett Architects

The central feature of this 2,489-square-foot renovation / addition project in Tarrytown is what homeowners call the jewelry box: a 745-square-foot living space with a 12-foot ceiling, fireplace, and glass wall made up of multiple clergy windows. Read more about this house.

Secure your tickets now for the AIA Austin Homes Tour on October 28th and 29th.

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