Austin doctor shares her experience with Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine

The Austin doctor shares her experience with Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine

Health officials are one of the first groups to receive the vaccine. Dr. Norwood at Dell Medical School says she looks forward to being part of this first wave.

According to Greg Abbott, Texas has distributed over 200,000 doses of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. An Austin doctor who received the vaccine says she waited a long time for this moment.

“The vaccine arrived on Monday and I received it on Wednesday,” said Dr. Aliza Norwood, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine and Population Health at Dell Medical School.

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The Pfizer vaccine arrived in Austin on Monday morning. Health officials are one of the first groups to receive the vaccine. Dr. Norwood at Dell Medical School says she looks forward to being part of this first wave.

“I think for all of the healthcare professionals who have worked on the front lines of this crisis, we’ve seen so many terrible things happen to our colleagues, our patients, and our communities, and that’s how this vaccine comes out so quickly and so effectively really, really exciting, “said Dr. Norwood.

Dr. Norwood says the process was simple and can easily be compared to a flu shot.

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“”[The nurse] took the needle and syringe and she put them in my left arm. I felt nothing, it was a very small needle, and after that it put on a plaster. I felt nothing for about five hours and then I got an arm pain which is to be expected and that has really been my only symptom so far, “said Dr. Norwood.

She says the only difference between the COVID-19 vaccine and the flu vaccine is that the Pfizer vaccine requires two doses. “The reason the second dose is important is because some vaccines require the immune system to be boosted, but it is not enough and therefore acts as a booster,” she said.

Dr. Norwood says she did her research before getting the vaccine and that the benefits outweighed the disadvantages many times over. In addition, the vaccine is incredibly safe. “About 4% of the people in the Moderna vaccine study had severe symptoms and actually only 1.5% in the Pfizer study,” she said.

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Distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine in Texas is expected to reach 1 million doses by the end of December

Governor Greg Abbott predicted that more than a million people in Texas will be vaccinated by the end of the month as these logistical efforts are massive.

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Dr. Norwood hopes to encourage others to get the vaccine when it becomes available.

“There are two main reasons to get the vaccine. One is to protect yourself so you don’t get sick and the other, which I would say is the same, is just as important to a society for you to have do not get.” infected so do not give it to anyone else, “said Dr. Norwood.

Dr. Norwood says she will have her second dose in early January.

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